Research Citations

Brian, Allan F. “Effect of Forest Fragmentation on Lyme Disease Risk.” Conservation Biology 17.1 (2003). Wiley Online Library. Wiley, 11 Feb. 2003. Web. 09 Oct. 2010.

Fisher, James. “Investigating the Role of White-footed Mice in the Transmission of Lyme Disease on Fire Island, New York.” Thesis. State University of New York, 2010. SUNY-ESF, SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry. SUNY-ESF. Web. 09 Oct. 2010.

Glass, Gregory E. “Environmental Risk Factors for Lyme Disease Identified with Geographic Information Systems.” American Journal of Public Health 85.7 (1995): 944-50. Digital Programs and Systems [Gateway]. Proquest. Web. 09 Oct. 2010.

“Mid-Atlantic RESAC Forest Change in Northern Virginia 1937-1998.” Department of Geography, University of Maryland Home Page. University of Maryland. Web. 09 Oct. 2010.

“Mid-Atlantic RESAC Forest Change in Northern Virginia 1937-1998.” Department of Geography, University of Maryland Home Page. University of Maryland. Web. 09 Oct. 2010.

¬†Olson, Sarah H. “Understanding Regional Patterns of Vector-borne Infectious Disease in a Changing Environment.” Diss. University of Wisconsin, 2010. Digital Programs and Systems [Gateway]. Proquest. Web. 09 Oct. 2010.

I think that the most useful citation will be the first one, “Effect of Forest Fragmentation on Lyme Disease Risk,” This citation will be helpful because it quantitatively explains the relationship between the changes in the environment that we are seeing in the DC area, and how that affects the rate of Lyme disease infection. Although this study took place in Connecticut, the fragmentation pattern described in the article are similar to those found in DC. Also, the other articles explain development or the spread of bacteria, but this one ties the two together, which is what I am trying to do.